Volume 11 Supplement 1

Abstracts of the Ninth International Congress on Drug Therapy in HIV Infection

Open Access

cART in vertically HIV-infected children treated since infancy

  • M Marczyñska1,
  • A Oldakowska1,
  • S Dobosz1,
  • M Szczepasñka-Putz1 and
  • J Popielska1
Journal of the International AIDS Society200811(Suppl 1):P217

https://doi.org/10.1186/1758-2652-11-S1-P217

Published: 10 November 2008

Purpose of the study

To evaluate cART efficacy, number of regimens and resistance development in vertically HIV-infected children treated since infancy.

Methods

27 children vertically infected with HIV. In 6/27 children treatment was started before HAART era. In 11/27 patients cART regimen was based on baseline resistance reports. Additionally, in eight children resistance tests were performed before therapy changing. (Table 1.)
Table 1

cART efficacy

 

ART before HAART era (before 1998)

Initial cART started without resistance testing

Initial cART based on resistance reports

No.of children

6

10

11

Current age

10–14 yr (mean 12 yr)

10 mo – 10 yr (mean 6 yr)

2–7 yr (mean 4, 5 yr)

The first regimen

NRTI

cART

cART

No. of cART regimens

2–3

1–5

1–3

No. of children receiving their first regimen currently

0

3

3

No. of children with VL<50 c/ml at evaluation

6

10

9

No. of patients with resistance testing before changing of ART

2

4

2

Single class resistance development

2 children (NRTI)

1 child (PI)

1 child (NRTI)

Double class resistance development

 

1 child (PI+NNRTI)

 

Triple class resistance development

 

2 children

1 child

Summary of Results

6/27 (22%) children have been receiving their first regimen (the length of treatment: 10 months – 4.5 years). 21/27 (78%) patients have changed their therapies, including 12/21 (57%) with treatment failure.

Conclusions

cART in vertically HIV-infected children treated since infancy is effective. Most of the patients had to change their regimens because of treatment failure or adverse events. Multidrug resistance (double or triple class) appeared in 15% of patients.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Children's Infectious Diseases, Warsaw Medical University

Copyright

© Marczyñska et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2008

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd.

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